Verizon Jetpack 890L

7.1/10 AVG.
RATING

  • Verizon Jetpack 890L

Specs / Features


Zte Verizon 890L 4G Lte Hotspot Hotspot Modem Worldwide Use In Over 200 Countri

Zte Verizon 890L 4G Lte Hotspot Hotspot Modem Worldwide Use In Over 200 Countri

Less

Specification

Brand ZTE
Model Jetpack (EUFI890)
Warranty 1 months

Reviews (7.1/10 Avg. rating)


TechRadar

A capable mobile hotspot that works around the world

from TechRadar

If you need a reliable Wi-Fi hotspot that's super fast in the States but also works in more than 200 countries you'll no doubt be pleased with the Jetpack 890L 4G LTE. Of course, the lack of an unlimited data option may be a deal-breaker for many power users. Folks who already have unlimited data plans on their cell phones, via T-Mobile, AT&T, Verizon or Sprint, may be better served to just use their mobile phones as Wi-FI hotspots.

Read full review

If you need a reliable Wi-Fi hotspot that's super fast in the States but also works in more than 200 countries you'll no doubt be pleased with the Jetpack 890L 4G LTE. Of course, the lack of an unlimited data option may be a deal-breaker for many power users. Folks who already have unlimited data plans on their cell phones, via T-Mobile, AT&T, Verizon or Sprint, may be better served to just use their mobile phones as Wi-FI hotspots.

Read full review

Less

Laptop Magazine

Global ready, fast overall performance

from Laptop Magazine

Although the first Verizon Jetpack 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot 890L we tested was slow and inconsistent, our testing of a second device leads us to believe that we had a bum unit. While the 890L's throughput was slower than the MiFi 4620L, it proved faster in real-world tests. Plus, the $19.99 890L is cheaper than the $49.99 MiFi. The reason why we still prefer the MiFi 4620L is its more intuitive interface, smaller footprint and longer battery life -- if you spring for the extended battery.

Read full review

Although the first Verizon Jetpack 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot 890L we tested was slow and inconsistent, our testing of a second device leads us to believe that we had a bum unit. While the 890L's throughput was slower than the MiFi 4620L, it proved faster in real-world tests. Plus, the $19.99 890L is cheaper than the $49.99 MiFi. The reason why we still prefer the MiFi 4620L is its more intuitive interface, smaller footprint and longer battery life -- if you spring for the extended battery.

Read full review

Less

The Verge

Fast speeds, global roaming support

from The Verge

Dedicated mobile hotspots are great; in fact, I'd go so far to say that they're one of the most important inventions of the last decade for road warriors. They're simple, relatively bulletproof ways to move a lot of data to multiple devices at once without being tied down to a landline. Frankly, I don't know how I'd live without one in this line of work.

And on some level, the 890L is a fine hotspot: it does its job reasonably and commendably with a minimum amount of hassle, and it does it for over five hours on a relatively small battery. But the fact is, Novatel's 4620L is a roundly better product with a better UI, better form factor, better materials, and more battery options — and if you're in the market for a hotspot, $30 upfront isn't going to make a difference. I don't know why I wouldn't spring for the Novatel instead, and I don't know why a customer shouldn't, either. 

Read full review

Dedicated mobile hotspots are great; in fact, I'd go so far to say that they're one of the most important inventions of the last decade for road warriors. They're simple, relatively bulletproof ways to move a lot of data to multiple devices at once without being tied down to a landline. Frankly, I don't know how I'd live without one in this line of work.

And on some level, the 890L is a fine hotspot: it does its job reasonably and commendably with a minimum amount of hassle, and it does it for over five hours on a relatively small battery. But the fact is, Novatel's 4620L is a roundly better product with a better UI, better form factor, better materials, and more battery options — and if you're in the market for a hotspot, $30 upfront isn't going to make a difference. I don't know why I wouldn't spring for the Novatel instead, and I don't know why a customer shouldn't, either. 

Read full review

Less

Ars Technica

Excellent network coverage, ease of configuration, and better battery life

from Ars Technica

The downsides to the Jetpack are few, but one may be a deal-breaker. First, after about three or so hours of consecutive use, pages began stalling as they loaded. Manually reloading fixed the problem, but it was a pain. Slow page loads are something I’ve experienced on three different occasions in two different locations. Second, if you use Dropbox or some other file-syncing solution, be aware of your syncing settings. The first time I fired up the Jetpack, my MacBook Air performed a Dropbox sync that managed to use up 75 percent of my monthly bandwidth allocation.

And that leads me to the biggest drawback to the Jetpack: Verizon’s bandwidth caps. Verizon charges $20 per month for monthly line access; data is extra. I went with 4GB of shared data (although this is my only Verizon device) for $30 per month. 6GB is $40 per month, while 8GB costs $50. You can add data in 2GB increments up to 20GB for $110, and if you go over your allotment, you’ll pay $10 per GB.

If you’re not going to be doing much more than surfing and e-mailing, you should be fine. But if you want to stream some video while on the road or need to move massive files around, your bandwidth well will quickly run dry. It’s a shame—this is the first wireless broadband device I’ve seen that could legitimately replace a wired home broadband connection, but doing so would be prohibitively expensive.

Whether the Jetpack is right for you depends on your needs. If you are looking for broadband redundancy at home, it’s a good—but pricey—backup. If you travel frequently and need broadband connectivity no matter where you are, it will do what you need. And with Verizon’s excellent network coverage, LTE speeds are widely available. Verizon boasts that its LTE network covers over 75 percent of the US population in 371 markets across the country, and I've yet to run into LTE network congestion problems. If, however, you’re irritated with your home cable broadband or DSL provider, the Jetpack isn’t a viable replacement. Sadly, that won’t change unless Verizon significantly relaxes or drops its bandwidth caps. Don’t count on that happening anytime soon. 

Read full review

The downsides to the Jetpack are few, but one may be a deal-breaker. First, after about three or so hours of consecutive use, pages began stalling as they loaded. Manually reloading fixed the problem, but it was a pain. Slow page loads are something I’ve experienced on three different occasions in two different locations. Second, if you use Dropbox or some other file-syncing solution, be aware of your syncing settings. The first time I fired up the Jetpack, my MacBook Air performed a Dropbox sync that managed to use up 75 percent of my monthly bandwidth allocation.

And that leads me to the biggest drawback to the Jetpack: Verizon’s bandwidth caps. Verizon charges $20 per month for monthly line access; data is extra. I went with 4GB of shared data (although this is my only Verizon device) for $30 per month. 6GB is $40 per month, while 8GB costs $50. You can add data in 2GB increments up to 20GB for $110, and if you go over your allotment, you’ll pay $10 per GB.

If you’re not going to be doing much more than surfing and e-mailing, you should be fine. But if you want to stream some video while on the road or need to move massive files around, your bandwidth well will quickly run dry. It’s a shame—this is the first wireless broadband device I’ve seen that could legitimately replace a wired home broadband connection, but doing so would be prohibitively expensive.

Whether the Jetpack is right for you depends on your needs. If you are looking for broadband redundancy at home, it’s a good—but pricey—backup. If you travel frequently and need broadband connectivity no matter where you are, it will do what you need. And with Verizon’s excellent network coverage, LTE speeds are widely available. Verizon boasts that its LTE network covers over 75 percent of the US population in 371 markets across the country, and I've yet to run into LTE network congestion problems. If, however, you’re irritated with your home cable broadband or DSL provider, the Jetpack isn’t a viable replacement. Sadly, that won’t change unless Verizon significantly relaxes or drops its bandwidth caps. Don’t count on that happening anytime soon. 

Read full review

Less

PC Magazine

Fast 4G speeds, good battery life

from PC Magazine

The Verizon Jetpack 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot 890L is great for getting your devices online here and abroad, but it isn't the best option available.

Read full review

The Verizon Jetpack 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot 890L is great for getting your devices online here and abroad, but it isn't the best option available.

Read full review

Less

Cnet

Good-looking, well-designed, and offers a very fast 4G connection

from Cnet

With great performance and excellent design, the Jetpack 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot 890L is another excellent mobile router for those who can afford its data plans.

Read full review

With great performance and excellent design, the Jetpack 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot 890L is another excellent mobile router for those who can afford its data plans.

Read full review

Less

Amazon.com Reviews Summary

69 from Amazon.com

69 Amazon.com shoppers shared a review for the Verizon Jetpack 890L. Ratings are middle of the road, averaging 3.7 out of 5 stars. See all Amazon.com customer reviews.

7.4/10

Resources


Review Sources Share / Embed

You can share this accessory with friends or embed the reviews widget on your website.

Q&A Forum


No questions for the moment.

Videos