Jawbone ERA (2014)

7.7/10 AVG.
RATING

  • Jawbone ERA (2014)
  • Jawbone ERA (2014)

Specs / Features


The smallest, lightest headset Jawbone has ever created at less than 2 inches long and weighing in at just 0.2 oz. | 4 hours of talk time, or up to 10 hours with charging case | NoiseAssassin 4.0 detects when you are speaking to eliminate background noise | Advanced ear fittings feature a new design that uses the natural contour of the ear to create a secure fit | ERA's built in locator and Jawbone App ensure you'll never lose it

The smallest, lightest headset Jawbone has ever created at less than 2 inches long and weighing in at just 0.2 oz. | 4 hours of talk time, or up to 10 hours with charging case | NoiseAssassin 4.0 detects when you are speaking to eliminate background noise | Advanced ear fittings feature a new design that uses the natural contour of the ear to create a secure fit | ERA's built in locator and Jawbone App ensure you'll never lose it

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Specification

Specification
Brand Jawbone
Model JC03-03-US
Size 1 cm (0.4 in)

Reviews summary

7.7/10AVG.
RATING
Based on 9 reviews

What's good

  • Good call quality and noise cancellation
  • Discrete and sleek design
  • Incredibly small and light

What's bad

  • Only 4 hours of talk-time
  • Poor voice quality when making calls

Hands-free headsets have been growing in popularity throughout the years, but more often than not they are either functional or fashionable. According to critics, Jawbone's latest Era Bluetooth headset has finally attained the perfect combination. It's 42 percent smaller than its predecessor, the original Era, and weighs a scant six grams.

The device itself consists of a little bar (available in silver, brown, red or black), an earbud, silicone ear loop and a power switch. Even without the ear loop, Slashgear describes its grip as "tenacious" noting that, "…we can shake our head frantically and still the ERA stays put. Despite that, it's comfortable too…"

Like Jawbone's previous headsets, the Era takes advantage of the NoiseAssassin technology. Its two microphones work together with the voice activity sensor to cancel out background noise during calls. During test calls, reviewers were quite pleased with the call quality and noticed a significant bump to overall volume. PCMag states, "…voices came through full, clear, and natural sounding…" Although in general calls come through clear, in very loud settings critics were frustrated with the lack of dedicated volume control and had to adjust the loudness by pressing the command key for a few moments. In addition, while calls sounded good through the earpiece, experts found voice transmission through the mic to be somewhat muddy on the other end.

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Due to its small size, Jawbone had to shrink the battery and its battery life suffered. Across the board reviewers clocked the Era lasting a mere 4 hours of talk time, which is very short when compared to other headsets in its price range. While it does come with an optional battery case that extends talk time to ten hours, it also bumps up the cost and significantly.

For the most part, reviewers appreciated the improved design and audio quality with GigaOm stating, "the Jawbone Era…is just as comfortable to wear for long periods of time…with a design that's a lot easier to swallow." Others like GottaBeMobile were slightly disappointed saying, "I'm not nearly as impressed with this newer ERA as I have been with the previous versions."

Reviews (7.7/10 Avg. rating)


TechRadar

Simply put, the Era is a marvel of engineering

from TechRadar

Jawbone pitched this renewed Era headset to us as another wearable technology that would allow us to interface with our smartphone handsfree.

And it did - kind of - but that implementation still needs a lot of work before it becomes intuitive and reliable enough to become mainstream.

...More

Jawbone pitched this renewed Era headset to us as another wearable technology that would allow us to interface with our smartphone handsfree.

And it did - kind of - but that implementation still needs a lot of work before it becomes intuitive and reliable enough to become mainstream.

Don't get us wrong - if you're looking for a Bluetooth headset, this is a really solid option. But it's not good enough to suggest everyone should go out and buy one as a way of getting more from their smartphone.

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Venture Beat

Aims to be the Bluetooth headset for people who hate Bluetooth headsets

from Venture Beat

Unless you have serious moral and aesthetic reservations against Bluetooth headsets, the Era is worth a look. It does a great job with calls, and it’s convenient for speaking voice commands to your phone.

Now more than ever, consumers seem ready to accept Bluetooth headsets. Just look around at all the headphones the next time you’re out in public — we’ve trained ourselves to be connected to our devices physically....

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Unless you have serious moral and aesthetic reservations against Bluetooth headsets, the Era is worth a look. It does a great job with calls, and it’s convenient for speaking voice commands to your phone.

Now more than ever, consumers seem ready to accept Bluetooth headsets. Just look around at all the headphones the next time you’re out in public — we’ve trained ourselves to be connected to our devices physically.

Now, we just need to get used to doing so wirelessly.

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PC Magazine

A modern Bluetooth headset with classic appeal

from PC Magazine

The Era by Jawbone is beautifully crafted, but more importantly, beautifully discreet. It's the first Bluetooth headset I'd be fine with wearing in public. Call quality isn't top of the line, but it's still very solid and audio through the earpiece trumps every other headset I've heard, if not through the mic....

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The Era by Jawbone is beautifully crafted, but more importantly, beautifully discreet. It's the first Bluetooth headset I'd be fine with wearing in public. Call quality isn't top of the line, but it's still very solid and audio through the earpiece trumps every other headset I've heard, if not through the mic.

If call quality is of utmost concern, you'll have to turn to the boom-mic equipped Plantronics Voyager Legend, which is anything but discreet. The Era remains one of the top-performing Bluetooth headsets, though, and coupled with the tasteful, unobtrusive design, it earns our Editors' Choice award for Bluetooth headsets.

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GottaBeMobile

Cons seem to outweigh the pros and the new innovations

from GottaBeMobile

Since Jawbone came on the scene it has branched out into the fitness market and also the Bluetooth speaker market. They’ve had considerable success in both of those markets with the UP wrist bands and Jambox speakers. I hate to say it but I don’t think the Bluetooth headsets are getting the same focus these days within the halls of Jawbone....

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Since Jawbone came on the scene it has branched out into the fitness market and also the Bluetooth speaker market. They’ve had considerable success in both of those markets with the UP wrist bands and Jambox speakers. I hate to say it but I don’t think the Bluetooth headsets are getting the same focus these days within the halls of Jawbone.

All it takes is a glance at the Jawbone store to see this. You have to scroll quite a ways down the page to find the first mention of the Bluetooth headsets. That’s certainly understandable, but if the new smaller ERA is a play to appeal more to a public that is starting to focus on Wearables, the size and design might do so, but practically speaking this headset is inferior to its larger predecessor in my experience.

The new ERA is replacing the older one which you still might find available in stores for a discount. If you don’t need any of the advanced features and size isn’t an issue you might want to give the older model a try.

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iLounge

Dramatic redesign brings better aesthetics with same great sound quality

from iLounge

Bluetooth headsets have become less relevant since the last Era came out, thanks in part to both cars with built-in speakerphones, and headphones with incorporated mics. Jawbone hasn’t let this stop it from building yet another good headset, but this one falls down a notch, earning our general recommendation....

More

Bluetooth headsets have become less relevant since the last Era came out, thanks in part to both cars with built-in speakerphones, and headphones with incorporated mics. Jawbone hasn’t let this stop it from building yet another good headset, but this one falls down a notch, earning our general recommendation.

The company has put most of the features we’d hope for in an even smaller, more attractive package, while removing accessories and lowering battery life, offset by a lower starting price. We would’ve liked to have seen improvements to the audio, especially two years on, or equivalent run time without the need for a charging accessory, but the new Era is a compromise—and one some people will like a lot more than others.

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Re/code

Smaller than ever yet offers better sound quality

from Re/code

The Era’s audio quality is unmistakable. All of my calls sounded clear, and its charging case not only gave it extra battery life, but also prevented me from losing the earpiece.

So, if you are a Bluetooth headset user and you want something small, you’ll want to consider the Era....

More

The Era’s audio quality is unmistakable. All of my calls sounded clear, and its charging case not only gave it extra battery life, but also prevented me from losing the earpiece.

So, if you are a Bluetooth headset user and you want something small, you’ll want to consider the Era.

For Bluetooth believers, its fresh design and audio capabilities help simplify smartphone communications where it counts.

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Techland

Smaller but manages to maintain the same level of quality

from Techland

The most immediately striking thing about the new Era is that it’s tiny — 42 percent smaller than the earlier Era, and also dinkier than the squatter, squarer Icon. Like other Jawbone products, it comes in multiple colors and case styles and aspires to look like fashionable jewelry as much as an electronic device — but at about two inches long, it’s also the company’s most discreet headset to date. Despite being so diminutive, it delivers up to 10 hours of battery life on a charge, according to Jawbone, up from 4.5 hours for the old Era. The company also says that the Era’s microphones are both smaller and better than those in past Jawbones....

More

The most immediately striking thing about the new Era is that it’s tiny — 42 percent smaller than the earlier Era, and also dinkier than the squatter, squarer Icon. Like other Jawbone products, it comes in multiple colors and case styles and aspires to look like fashionable jewelry as much as an electronic device — but at about two inches long, it’s also the company’s most discreet headset to date. Despite being so diminutive, it delivers up to 10 hours of battery life on a charge, according to Jawbone, up from 4.5 hours for the old Era. The company also says that the Era’s microphones are both smaller and better than those in past Jawbones.

The earbud is new, too: It’s got a long tail that’s designed to help keep the headset safely wedged in your ear even if you use it while running or biking. Jawbone includes four sizes: medium and large versions for the left and right ear, down from the eight earbuds that came with the prior Era.

It all looks nice and works well, but I did miss one feature in the old Era: You could control it by tapping anywhere on the headset, as if the whole thing was one giant button. The new model ditches this clever approach in favor of a conventional button, requiring slightly more futzing, and also loses a feature that let you pick up the headset, shake it twice and then stick it in your ear to take a call.

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SlashGear

Compact and stylish choice for either personal or business use

from SlashGear

When you hear wearables, the expectation is usually some sort of Glass-style head mounted display. Yet there's still plenty to be done with audio-only: a clandestine whisper of information into your ear, funneling in directions, messages, and other answers, not to mention calls.

Jawbone's integration with Siri and Google Now is ambitious, and it has to be said more successful on iOS than Android. The latter is, as can so often be the case, very much device-dependent, though Android's inherent customizability does mean it should be a relatively straightforward matter to get Google Now playing more readily on more devices....

More

When you hear wearables, the expectation is usually some sort of Glass-style head mounted display. Yet there's still plenty to be done with audio-only: a clandestine whisper of information into your ear, funneling in directions, messages, and other answers, not to mention calls.

Jawbone's integration with Siri and Google Now is ambitious, and it has to be said more successful on iOS than Android. The latter is, as can so often be the case, very much device-dependent, though Android's inherent customizability does mean it should be a relatively straightforward matter to get Google Now playing more readily on more devices.

That's a good thing, because bringing those virtual assistants discretely to your ear is arguably of more use for most smartphone owners than crystal-clear voice calls. The 2014 ERA update obviously delivers those too, without a huge compromise on style, while the tiny form factor belies the battery life you can achieve.

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Cnet

Affordable and reliable but short on battery life

from Cnet

For people who need to talk a lot on the go, only the freedom of a hands-free Bluetooth headset will do. The trouble is wireless handset makers have traditionally had difficulty delivering excellent call quality along with a practical yet, dare I say, fashionable design. The new Jawbone Era, however, comes the closest yet to attaining this coveted Bluetooth combo....

More

For people who need to talk a lot on the go, only the freedom of a hands-free Bluetooth headset will do. The trouble is wireless handset makers have traditionally had difficulty delivering excellent call quality along with a practical yet, dare I say, fashionable design. The new Jawbone Era, however, comes the closest yet to attaining this coveted Bluetooth combo.

Of course the Jawbone Era won't satisfy everyone. Its short battery life isn't ideal for marathon chatterboxes, and those with big hands might find the device's small button and power switch tricky to operate. Even so, the Era's clean audio quality and powerful noise-cancellation are hard to pass up.

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Amazon.com Reviews Summary

1,493 from Amazon.com

1,493 Amazon.com shoppers shared a review for the Jawbone ERA (2014). Ratings are middle of the road, averaging 3.3 out of 5 stars. See all Amazon.com customer reviews.

6.6/10

Amazon.ca Reviews Summary

2 from Amazon.ca

2 Amazon.ca shoppers shared a review for the Jawbone ERA (2014). Ratings are middle of the road, averaging 3.5 out of 5 stars. See all Amazon.ca customer reviews.

7/10

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