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Sony Reader PRS-T2 review

6/10 AVG.
RATING



6/10
Informr score
The Sony Reader PRS-T2 currently has an Informr score of 6 out of 10. This score is based on our evaluation of 8 sources including reviews from users and the web's most trusted critics.

The e-reader market has many excellent choices for those who want a simple and easy-to-use device for reading on the go. One example is the Sony PRS-T2, which comes in the 6-inch form factor and is available in three different colors. Sony has been in the e-book reader market longer than many of its competitors, so it definitely knows a thing or two about how to make a great device and the accompanying e-book ecosystem to back it.

The T2 doesn’t come with many bells and whistles. But it does have pretty much all the basic features. Its 6-inch screen has a native resolution of 600x800 pixels and it features a grayscale e-ink panel that’s great for long-term use as it barely consumes any battery during usage. The battery can last for up to 30 hours of continuous reading per charge or an entire month on standby.

Charging the battery takes about 2 hours, and it can be done through the available USB port. Extra storage space is also afforded with the built-in microSD card slot. And for a wireless connection, it has 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi.

One of the best things about this reader is that its easy to operate and stays out of the users way. It looks sleek at only 9mm (0.35 inches) thin and can be operated via either touchscreen controls or hardware buttons. Sony’s own e-book ecosystem isn’t as robust as Barnes & Noble’s or Amazon’s, but it’s full of classics and will hardly let anyone down, plus there’s a free public access library where books can be borrowed from as well.

Need to Know: Sony PRS-T2

1. Built-in battery lasts up to a month in standby or up to 30 hours of continuous reading. (The Good)

2. Comes with a free copy of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. (The Good)

3. Sony’s own e-book library can’t quite match those of its competitors. (The Bad)

4. Lacks extra features like built-in camera or 3G data. (The Bad)


Screen Size
6"
Storage
1.3 GB
3G
No
Reading Time
30 hours


What the Critics Are Saying...


Tech Advisor

The Sony Reader PRS-T2 offers a greatly improved menu and apps over its predecessor. The Reader Store integration is a bit fiddly, and the selection of books can't match Amazon. The biggest problem, however, is the high price considering the lack of a built-in light.

- Mary-Ann Russon, Tech Advisor
Digital Trends

The Sony Reader is a fine device. If you’re already invested in Sony’s Reader store, you’ll find a good device here to read on. The only problem with it is that Sony’s competition has jumped ahead. Both the newest Nook and Kindle offer light-up screens for night reading and s...

- Jeffrey Van Camp, Digital Trends
SlashGear

So, by now you know that the Sony Reader PRS-T2 comes packed with a lot of nifty features. That’s all well and good, but it doesn’t matter much if you have a device that isn’t comfortable in use. Thankfully, the Reader PRS-T2 succeeds there as well, and it’s lightweight desig...

- Eric Abent, SlashGear
Wired

It has crisp, high-contrast screen. Excellent library integration. Use USB and microSD to side-load ePubs, PDFs, and text documents. Battery lasts forever (around two months). But E-ink artifacts are ugly and persistent. No lighting options, so you’ll need a case or clip-on accessory. Suffers...

- Roberto Baldwin, Wired
Laptop Magazine

While Sony still wins on note-taking among e-readers, it falls behind the Kindle and Nook competition in many other areas, and costs $30 more. Among other things, the dropped Wi-Fi connections vexed us repeatedly. The Reader PRS-T2 also lacks some of the features offered by its competitors, such as...

- Anna Attkisson, Laptop Magazine


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Quick view

Screen Size
6"

The Sony Reader PRS-T2's screen size is 6 inches with x pixels resolution.

Backlight
Yes

There is a built-in backlight for reading in the dark.

Storage
1.3 GB

Internal memory is 1.3 GB. An external, MicroSD, MicroSDHC (up to 32 GB) expansion slot is available for increased storage capacity.

3G
No

This model has no 3G wireless capabilities.

Reading Time
30 hours

The e-reader is powered by a Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion), 1000 mAh battery. Battery life is rated for up to 30 days standby time according to Sony's.

Reader PRS-T2 Specs

Overview
Release date August 17, 2012
Regions available USA, Canada
Networks
No cellular data
SIM card No
Operating System
Processor
Internal Storage 1.3 GB
RAM No
ROM No
Flightmode No
TTY/TDD No
SAR Unknown
Languages No
Manufacturer Warranty 1 Year
Accessories Included AC Charger, Data Cable, Manual, Standard Battery, Stylus
Power & battery
Type Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion)
Battery Capacity 1000 mAh
Removable Battery No
Wireless Charging No
Fast Charging No
Battery Charge Time 2 hours
Reading Time Up to: 30 hours
Standby Time Up to: 30 days
Physical Characteristics
Material Plastic
Colors Black, White, Red
Dimensions [H x W x D] 17.3 x 11.0 x 0.9 cm (6.8 x 4.3 x 0.4 in)
Weight 164 grams
Water Resistant / Waterproof Unknown
Rugged design No
IP Rating No
Display / Screen
Type Grayscale
Technology E-ink
Colors Unknown
Resolution x pixels
Pixel density Unknown
Size 6 inches
Backlit Illumination Yes
Zoom / Magnification Yes
Screen Orientation Lock No
Multi-Touch No
Fingerprint-Resistant Coating No
Anti Glare No
Additional Display Features -
Input / Navigation
Touchscreen Yes
Sleep / Wake Key No
Home Key Yes
Page Turn Key No
Physical keyboard No
Text-to-Speech No
Screen Reader No
Keypad/Screen Lock No
External Volume Control No
Fingerprint Sensor No
Web / Email / Messaging
Web Browser Yes
Connectivity
USB Yes
USB OTG Support No
Infrared No
Bluetooth No
WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
WiFi Encryption No
Memory Expansion Slot Yes
Expansion Slot Info MicroSD, MicroSDHC
PC Synchronization Yes
DLNA Support No
NFC No
Audio / Video
Audio Playback No
Audio Formats No
Video Playback No
Video Playback Formats No
Streaming Video No
External Speakers No
Headset Jack No
Vibration Alert No
Content Formats Supported
Content Formats Supported No
More
Additional comments Other Names (AKA): Sony PRS-T2

Related Links Manual (PDF)
Sony Reader PRS-T2 Reviews
Where to buy Sony Reader PRS-T2
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Critic Reviews


Tech Advisor

Continues where its predecessor left off combining the same slim design with faster, performance and more functionality

from Tech Advisor

The Sony Reader PRS-T2 offers a greatly improved menu and apps over its predecessor. The Reader Store integration is a bit fiddly, and the selection of books can't match Amazon. The biggest problem, however, is the high price considering the lack of a built-in light.

Read full review

The Sony Reader PRS-T2 offers a greatly improved menu and apps over its predecessor. The Reader Store integration is a bit fiddly, and the selection of books can't match Amazon. The biggest problem, however, is the high price considering the lack of a built-in light.

Read full review

Less

Digital Trends

It’s hard to recommend a product that costs more and offers less

from Digital Trends

The Sony Reader is a fine device. If you’re already invested in Sony’s Reader store, you’ll find a good device here to read on. The only problem with it is that Sony’s competition has jumped ahead. Both the newest Nook and Kindle offer light-up screens for night reading an...More

The Sony Reader is a fine device. If you’re already invested in Sony’s Reader store, you’ll find a good device here to read on. The only problem with it is that Sony’s competition has jumped ahead. Both the newest Nook and Kindle offer light-up screens for night reading and smoother touch controls; they rely less on physical buttons, another small way the Reader is slightly behind the times. And even these issues wouldn’t be a problem if Sony would price the Reader more competitively. It currently costs $130. By comparison, both the Nook Paperwhite and Nook Simple Touch with Glowlight cost $120. It’s hard to recommend a product that costs more and offers less, but if you like physical buttons, don’t need a light-up screen, or want extra storage (microSD), Sony’s reader is a decent option.

Read full review

Less

SlashGear

Aside from the price, there’s a lot to like about the device

from SlashGear

So, by now you know that the Sony Reader PRS-T2 comes packed with a lot of nifty features. That’s all well and good, but it doesn’t matter much if you have a device that isn’t comfortable in use. Thankfully, the Reader PRS-T2 succeeds there as well, and it’s lightweight design (the Reader PRS-T2 comes in at just under 6 ounces) makes it very easy to hold. That’s true even for someone like me, who has hands that may as well belong to Hagrid or Andre the Giant. The only problem is that the PRS-T2’s lightweight design also makes it feel a bit fragile. It’s definitely sleek and minimalistic (no ugly full keyboards here), but it also demands that you treat it gently. Naturally, I’m not going to start hurling it across the room to test its durability, but it’s safe to say that exercising a little extra caution when transporting it isn’t a bad idea, especially with that 6-inch screen taking up most of the front....

More

So, by now you know that the Sony Reader PRS-T2 comes packed with a lot of nifty features. That’s all well and good, but it doesn’t matter much if you have a device that isn’t comfortable in use. Thankfully, the Reader PRS-T2 succeeds there as well, and it’s lightweight design (the Reader PRS-T2 comes in at just under 6 ounces) makes it very easy to hold. That’s true even for someone like me, who has hands that may as well belong to Hagrid or Andre the Giant. The only problem is that the PRS-T2’s lightweight design also makes it feel a bit fragile. It’s definitely sleek and minimalistic (no ugly full keyboards here), but it also demands that you treat it gently. Naturally, I’m not going to start hurling it across the room to test its durability, but it’s safe to say that exercising a little extra caution when transporting it isn’t a bad idea, especially with that 6-inch screen taking up most of the front.

It’s easy to fall for the Reader PRS-T2 – that much is definitely true. However, with that being said, we’ve already seen most of these features on other eReaders. There’s no question that the Sony Reader PRS-T2 is a solid eReader, but that unfortunately doesn’t help with the feeling that it’s a little late to the party. Sony is to be commended for releasing a feature-rich eReader like the one I’ve been enjoying recently, but I wish it had done so sooner. It comes with something of a steep price tag too – $130. Of course, it’s important to remember that the price of this Reader isn’t subsidized with ads, but I still feel like the price is a little too high for what you’re ultimately getting. If Sony would bring the price down a little bit, it would do a lot to make the Reader PRS-T2 a hit with the eReader fanatics of the world.

Still, aside from the price, there’s a lot to like about the device. I certainly have no major qualms with it, and in fact I really enjoyed the time I spent with it. If you can get over the price and don’t mind the fact that you won’t have a backlight at your disposal, then I’m sure you’ll be satisfied with the Reader PRS-T2. It comes packed with a lot of extra features and is easy to use – making it a good idea for those who are new to the eReader scene – and it’s a good looking device to boot, so if you’re in the market for a new eReader, definitely give the PRS-T2 a look before you make your decision.

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Wired

Releasing a brand new e-reader and not including a glowing screen isn’t just poor timing, it’s a huge missed opportunity

from Wired

It has crisp, high-contrast screen. Excellent library integration. Use USB and microSD to side-load ePubs, PDFs, and text documents. Battery lasts forever (around two months). But E-ink artifacts are ugly and persistent. No lighting options, so you’ll need a case or clip-on accessory. Suffe...More

It has crisp, high-contrast screen. Excellent library integration. Use USB and microSD to side-load ePubs, PDFs, and text documents. Battery lasts forever (around two months). But E-ink artifacts are ugly and persistent. No lighting options, so you’ll need a case or clip-on accessory. Suffers from ecosystem envy. Wi-Fi only. Evernote integration is confusing for newbie note-takers.

Read full review

Less

Laptop Magazine

This e-reader can't keep up with the competition

from Laptop Magazine

While Sony still wins on note-taking among e-readers, it falls behind the Kindle and Nook competition in many other areas, and costs $30 more. Among other things, the dropped Wi-Fi connections vexed us repeatedly. The Reader PRS-T2 also lacks some of the features offered by its competitors, such...More

While Sony still wins on note-taking among e-readers, it falls behind the Kindle and Nook competition in many other areas, and costs $30 more. Among other things, the dropped Wi-Fi connections vexed us repeatedly. The Reader PRS-T2 also lacks some of the features offered by its competitors, such as device-to-device lending and Twitter support. For $129, we expect more from an e-reader, especially since the Nook Simple Touch with GlowLight costs just $10 more.

Read full review

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The Verge

Fast response performance, thin and light

from The Verge

The Reader PRS-T2 is Sony's best model yet, by far — it's faster and more responsive than ever, and added some genuinely great features to the mix as well. Sony's ecosystem is also becoming more compelling, as the company's phones and tablets get better — though the missing iOS app is a huge hole. Evernote integration sets my heart aflutter, but as useful as it is it doesn't feel quite finished....

More

The Reader PRS-T2 is Sony's best model yet, by far — it's faster and more responsive than ever, and added some genuinely great features to the mix as well. Sony's ecosystem is also becoming more compelling, as the company's phones and tablets get better — though the missing iOS app is a huge hole. Evernote integration sets my heart aflutter, but as useful as it is it doesn't feel quite finished.

Next to last year's Kindle and Nook, it might be a competitive third ebook reader option for $129. Unfortunately it's 2012, and Sony's Reader comes to market already behind. Barnes & Noble added a glowing backlight to the latest Nook, a fantastic addition that makes reading in bed or in the dark possible without any extra eye strain. All indications are that this week, Amazon will announce a new Kindle with an entirely new Paperwhite display technology, plus a backlight similar to the Nook's. It feels like Sony's a full generation behind: last year Amazon and Barnes & Noble both introduced very good E Ink Pearl readers, and have since added and evolved on top of them; Sony's latest Reader just hasn't kept up.

No matter what you do, wait and see what Amazon does this week. But even as Sony's given me hope it can someday be the Evernote companion I've always wanted, for now it's given me no reason to steer anyone away from a Kindle or a Nook. When you factor in the fact that the cheapest Kindle is all of $79, the choice becomes a no-brainer.

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Good E-Reader

Solid Bookstore, good ePub customization options and fast and robust

from Good E-Reader

If you are looking for a dedicated e-reader that allows you to browse and borrow free eBooks from the library, this is for you. There is simply no other e-reader on the market that makes the entire borrowing process intuitive and easy to understand. If you are the type of person that just buys al...More

If you are looking for a dedicated e-reader that allows you to browse and borrow free eBooks from the library, this is for you. There is simply no other e-reader on the market that makes the entire borrowing process intuitive and easy to understand. If you are the type of person that just buys all your books, the Sony bookstore has a varied selection of bestsellers. It does not have the sheer amount of books that Kobo, Amazon or Barnes and Noble has, but is adequate if you just want to read popular books.

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Engadget

Same old e-reader, new and (mostly) improved design

from Engadget

Similar to its predecessor, the PRS-T2 offers plenty to like, from dual-touch pinch-to-zoom to note-taking capabilities to easy public library access. There's nothing here that really blows us away, however, leaving the Reader feeling like little more than a gently tweaked version of the (admitte...More

Similar to its predecessor, the PRS-T2 offers plenty to like, from dual-touch pinch-to-zoom to note-taking capabilities to easy public library access. There's nothing here that really blows us away, however, leaving the Reader feeling like little more than a gently tweaked version of the (admittedly good) last-gen model. It's certainly a better-looking device, though the new, sharp-edged metal buttons feel like a misfire. And while we definitely appreciate the speed here, the text ghosting can be a bit distracting. Sony's also seen fit to drop the price to a competitive $129 (that's $10 cheaper than the glowing Nook). Oh, and the company's throwing in a copy of "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" to help sweeten the pot. In all, the new Reader should maintain Sony's current position in the market: a solid -- but imperfect -- alternative to the big two.

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