Inbox

9/10 AVG.
RATING
  • Inbox
  • Inbox
  • Inbox
  • Inbox
  • Inbox

App Store Description


Inbox by Gmail requires an invite. Email inbox@google.com to request one. Your email inbox should help you live and work better, but instead it often buries the important stuff and creates more stress than it relieves. Inbox, built by the Gmail team, keeps things organized and helps you get back... More

Inbox by Gmail requires an invite. Email inbox@google.com to request one.

Your email inbox should help you live and work better, but instead it often buries the important stuff and creates more stress than it relieves. Inbox, built by the Gmail team, keeps things organized and helps you get back to what matters.

• BUNDLES - Similar messages are bundled together so you can deal with them all at once. And get rid of them with one tap.

• HIGHLIGHTS - Get the most important information without even opening the message. Check-in for flights, see shipping information for purchases, and view photos from friends right up front.

• REMINDERS: More than mail, you can add Reminders so your inbox contains all the things you need to get back to.

• SNOOZE: Snooze emails and Reminders to come back when you are ready to deal with them: next week, when you get home, or whenever you choose.

• SEARCH: Inbox helps you find exactly what you’re looking for— from your upcoming flight to a friend's address— without having to dig through messages.

• WORKS WITH GMAIL: Inbox is built by the Gmail team, so all your messages from Gmail are here, along with the reliability and spam protection of Gmail. All of your messages are still in Gmail and always will be.

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URL
iTunes Download
Developer
Google, Inc.
Recomended Age
4+
Operating System
iOS
App Store Category
Productivity
Version
1.3.38
Avg. iTunes Rating (Current)
4/5 stars (58 votes)
Avg. iTunes Rating (All time)
4.5/5 stars (18,957 votes)

Reviews (9/10 Avg. rating)


Faster and smoother than the standard Gmail app

from TechCrunch

While Inbox is slightly slower and crashes a little more often, I still think it’s a worthy effort. It’s also still early on for Inbox, and I am looking forward to retesting after the full release to see how it goes. I can see myself using Inbox as my primary email app as soon as they... More

While Inbox is slightly slower and crashes a little more often, I still think it’s a worthy effort. It’s also still early on for Inbox, and I am looking forward to retesting after the full release to see how it goes. I can see myself using Inbox as my primary email app as soon as they support my work email. Until then I am going to have to stick to Gmail.

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Comes close to mastering email

from Re/code

Lest you think I’m drinking too much of the Inbox Kool-Aid, let me tick off some things that annoy me about it. For starters, Inbox buries the CC and BCC options in composed emails, forcing you to hunt around and find a tiny arrow that, when pressed, reveals these lines... More

Lest you think I’m drinking too much of the Inbox Kool-Aid, let me tick off some things that annoy me about it. For starters, Inbox buries the CC and BCC options in composed emails, forcing you to hunt around and find a tiny arrow that, when pressed, reveals these lines. Most people would never find this option. Since Inbox learns your email behavior as you use it, it should also learn that if someone uses CC often, the CC line should automatically appear when that person composes emails.

Second, Inbox on the desktop replaces Google Talk with Google+ Hangouts, which really bugs me. Instead of simply listing all of your friends who are online at any given time, Hangouts shows you a list starting with the people you’ve talked to most recently. This means that even if someone is offline, you see that person’s name. But these names are only visible when you click on an icon. And the large font and layout of Hangouts in Inbox forces you to scroll too much; it’s not as functional as good old Google Talk.

Finally, since Inbox doesn’t yet work with Gmail for business, you’ll probably have to switch back and forth between it and your other email apps. This gets annoying.

Google’s engineers have learned a lot about handling email in Gmail over the past decade, and they obviously put this to good use in Inbox. It’s an email cure for almost all that ails you.

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Gives the ability to schedule emails and reminders

from The Incidental Economist

I like Inbox. I am using it almost exclusively. Scheduling/snoozing is the killer app. It helps me manage my life and my inbox. This is good.

However, Google needs to bring in or bring back more of Gmails functionality to make Inbox a full-service email app. I believe this is their int... More

I like Inbox. I am using it almost exclusively. Scheduling/snoozing is the killer app. It helps me manage my life and my inbox. This is good.

However, Google needs to bring in or bring back more of Gmails functionality to make Inbox a full-service email app. I believe this is their intention, but I don’t fully trust them. (Sorry, they lost my trust long ago.) Let’s wait and see.

If you get an Inbox invitation, take it! I wish I could give you one, but Google has not granted me any (yet?). Perhaps my invites have been snoozed.

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Google Inbox too complicated to be useful

from AlphaBeatic

Compared to a regular email app, which generally consists of straight, horizontal lines of text, Google Inbox is a veritable dog’s breakfast. Circular icons, attachment images and lots of white space combine to create an overly busy layout. I initially thought it looked like Facebook &ndash... More

Compared to a regular email app, which generally consists of straight, horizontal lines of text, Google Inbox is a veritable dog’s breakfast. Circular icons, attachment images and lots of white space combine to create an overly busy layout. I initially thought it looked like Facebook – that busyness might work for a social network and its rich media, but not so much for email, where bare-bones information is more important than bells and whistles:

Google Inbox’s features are also a lot to chew on. I might have been tempted to use them one at a time, and then slowly turn on additional features, but as it is they’re thrown at you all at once. It’s hard to know where to start.

It reminds me of an analogy for robots I once heard from an executive of Roomba maker iRobot. Cars or planes, he said, don’t become entirely autonomous overnight. They become robotic one step at a time, with users absorbing each new automation before another one is introduced. You’d think that Google, a pioneer in robot cars, would know that.

The other problem with Google Inbox is that it’s an all or nothing proposition. If you try it out on your phone, it’s going to affect your email wherever you use it.

One feature, for example, allows you to check an email as “done,” at which point it’s whisked away for safe-keeping and stored out of sight somewhere. But if you look at your old-fashioned Gmail inbox on a device where you don’t actually have the Inbox app running, that message is gone. You have to run a search to find it in your archives. In that way, Inbox nudges you to use it either everywhere or nowhere.

It’s possible and maybe even likely that Google will indeed blend all these features into Gmail itself, and email as a whole will slowly but surely become easier to manage. But as it stands, I’m not convinced of the need to wholly redesign the concept.

Email works well as it is, the only real problem is there’s too much of it. Messing with a long-established system that many people are accustomed to, as Google Inbox does, isn’t the answer to that dilemma.

 

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Centered on the idea that your emails should be treated like a to-do list

from Droid Life

After spending a lot of time playing with Inbox and using it as my full time Gmail app I have to say that I still prefer Mailbox, especially if your workflow includes OS X. Mailbox for OS X is so much faster to use than Inbox in Chrome. Emails can be archived or snoozed by swiping over them with... More

After spending a lot of time playing with Inbox and using it as my full time Gmail app I have to say that I still prefer Mailbox, especially if your workflow includes OS X. Mailbox for OS X is so much faster to use than Inbox in Chrome. Emails can be archived or snoozed by swiping over them with the mouse or with the arrow keys. You don’t ever have to leave the keyboard when using Mailbox, which also makes it much faster to use. ⌘N creates a new message, / starts a search, ⌘Number gets you into Snooze (2), Lists (3), Archive (4), etc. If Inbox had the ability to archive and snooze messages that easily then I would call it a draw, but with Mailbox’s native OS X support it’s the clear winner. If you’re on a PC then I would probably use Inbox simply because it’s prettier than Gmail with the same functionality. If you never use a computer to use your email then it comes down your personal preferences for the apps. I think Inbox is prettier than Mailbox, and if you’re on Android then it will feel far more native than Mailbox does. If you’re on iOS or need a unified inbox, however, I would stick with Mailbox.

While Gmail promises that Inbox is just a side project, I really hope that Inbox becomes Gmail. It’s prettier, better designed, and fun to use. It may be a pretty heavy rip off of Mailbox (what modern Gmail app isn’t?), but it works well and the added features of pins and reminders set Inbox apart as potentially more helpful for organizing your emails as a to-do list than Mailbox. 

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App Store Reviews Summary

18,957 from iTunes App Store

18,957 App Store customers have shared a review for Inbox. Ratings are generally positive averaging 4.5 out of 5 stars all time. The most current version of the app has 58 ratings with an average 4 out of 5 stars.

9/10

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